Getting Comfortable Asking Uncomfortable Questions Regarding War

Getting Comfortable Asking Uncomfortable Questions Regarding War

The situation in Ukraine is waking people to the prospects of what was thought impossible; now is the time to start getting comfortable planning for uncomfortable scenarios. 

By Larry Walsh 

Many people over the years have used variations of the quote “get comfortable being uncomfortable.” This rhetorical phrase is often used as a prerequisite for success amid change. Evolving technology, shifting priorities, new business models, and changing customer expectations don’t sit well with people who have made their bones on tried-and-true methodologies – or are comfortable with what they do and how they do it.  

“Get comfortable being uncomfortable” is taking on new meaning in light of the war in Ukraine and the prospects of potential escalation. Before the Russian invasion on February 25, few people thought about the prospects of a major regional or world war breaking out. As such, they didn’t consider the consequences up and down the scale.  

The technology industry – and, by extension, the channel – is global and, therefore, particularly exposed to the threats and disruptions caused by conflict. Everything about technology, from the sourcing of raw materials to the consumption of products, depends on global supply and distribution networks. Vendors, distributors, and resellers built their fortunes and futures on access to markets on both ends of the spectrum.  

The technology industry – and, by extension, the channel – is global and, therefore, particularly exposed to the threats and disruptions caused by conflict.

Some people like to think of technology as a great unifier. Since the dawn of the Internet, technology has made the world much smaller. Through digital communications, instant access to information, and the ubiquity of common resources, technology has made the world seem interconnected. Not a day goes by without billions of people communicating and collaborating seamlessly across all time zones.  

Global interconnectedness made many people believe in Yoshihiro Francis Fukuyama’s proclamation that war and conflict are obsolete. This perception led to complacency, lulling people – particularly decision-makers – into avoiding contemplating uncomfortable questions and scenarios. We can no longer afford to follow that head-in-the-sand strategy.  

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Larry Walsh, The 2112 GroupLarry Walsh is the CEO, chief analyst, and founder of Channelnomics. He’s an expert in the development and execution of channel programs, disruptive sales models, and growth strategies for companies worldwide. Follow him on Twitter at @lmwalsh_CN.